itscolossal:

Helene Caillaud itscolossal:

Helene Caillaud itscolossal:

Helene Caillaud itscolossal:

Helene Caillaud

Julien Mauve - After Lights Out, 2013
"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

Julien Mauve - After Lights Out, 2013
"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

Julien Mauve - After Lights Out, 2013
"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

Julien Mauve - After Lights Out, 2013
"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

Julien Mauve - After Lights Out, 2013
"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

Julien Mauve - After Lights Out, 2013
"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

Julien Mauve - After Lights Out, 2013
"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

Julien Mauve After Lights Out, 2013

"Anxiety and the danger of shadows mixed in with safety and well-being" 

(via notthatjesus)

The Journey to My Indonesian Child

Now before anyone assumes I had sex to get this child, I mean sponsor a child. Or as I would like to think of it, adopt one. A while ago, this organization called Compassion came to my college and had an event talking about the children and how a lot of them live in poverty and are unable to afford their basic needs. They showed videos of people who had been sponsored when they were children and were now full grown adults and they were very grateful for the people who had sponsored them. This, of course, got me thinking about all the things I’ve been blessed with like living in a rich bountiful country, having a roof over my head every day of my life, and access to food, water etc. And, of course, I was influenced to give to these kids, but I didn’t have the money. I was struggling to take care of myself as it was.

But I kept thinking about it and hadn’t stopped. Then I came across this article about this woman who was 19, married, and she had a baby. She worked in a clothing factory with horrible working conditions. This woman had to leave work early one day because her daughter was sick and she had to tend to her. When she returned, she was fired just like that. She already made a very little bit of money and her husband also made very little even with two jobs, this was devastating for the family. Eventually she was able to find another job but the article ends with her saying that everyone she knows has to get factory jobs since that’s all that is available. When asked what she could do she shrugged and said, “you can’t break a rock with an egg”. That broke my heart. I thought of this woman and how she would be able to provide for her family and then I thought of her daughter. I thought about how her daughter would have to grow up in poverty and follow her mother’s footsteps and her children and so on. I thought to myself, “I don’t want her to have to go through that.”

Ever since that day, I had an imprint on my heart to help an Indonesian child. I wanted to save a child from that type of struggle and hardship so I decided and talked to my (at the time boyfriend) and we both agreed that we wanted to adopt a child when we get married and when we’re ready. Money, however, has been scarce as it always is but I was constantly thinking of that little indonesian family. I thought of the daughter and of her mother and her poor father working tirelessly to provide for her. So much so that I had a dream my fiance and I went to Indonesia to adopt an orphaned boy named Hector.

And finally, finally, today we made the decision together to sponsor a child together. I can’t explain how much joy this brings to my heart. It’s like a little flame is glowing in my heart and I’m excited to see what it will turn into. I keep wondering if it will be a boy like Hector from my dream or a girl like the woman’s daughter and no matter what sex the cild happens to be, I am so happy that I am able to positively affect a child’s life. I’m very excited for the possibility of a bond with this child and for my fiance and I to, as a couple, create soemthing together.

So wherever you are, child, and whoever you are, I can’t wait to meet you, help you, and find out who you are.                     

lomographicsociety:

Fascinating Photographs by Edward Steichen From the First Fashion Photo Shoot
Renowned American photographer Edward Steichen had many notable achievements under his belt, one of them being credited to be the first to conduct “the first ever modern fashion photography shoot” in 1911. http://bit.ly/1qgokwJ lomographicsociety:

Fascinating Photographs by Edward Steichen From the First Fashion Photo Shoot
Renowned American photographer Edward Steichen had many notable achievements under his belt, one of them being credited to be the first to conduct “the first ever modern fashion photography shoot” in 1911. http://bit.ly/1qgokwJ lomographicsociety:

Fascinating Photographs by Edward Steichen From the First Fashion Photo Shoot
Renowned American photographer Edward Steichen had many notable achievements under his belt, one of them being credited to be the first to conduct “the first ever modern fashion photography shoot” in 1911. http://bit.ly/1qgokwJ lomographicsociety:

Fascinating Photographs by Edward Steichen From the First Fashion Photo Shoot
Renowned American photographer Edward Steichen had many notable achievements under his belt, one of them being credited to be the first to conduct “the first ever modern fashion photography shoot” in 1911. http://bit.ly/1qgokwJ

lomographicsociety:

Fascinating Photographs by Edward Steichen From the First Fashion Photo Shoot

Renowned American photographer Edward Steichen had many notable achievements under his belt, one of them being credited to be the first to conduct “the first ever modern fashion photography shoot” in 1911. http://bit.ly/1qgokwJ

silly-cutie-pretty-weirdo:

tank-grrl:

hello-missmayhem:

cptprocrastination:

doomhamster:

belcanta:

nikkidubs:

attentiondeficitaptitude:

belcanta:

Guaranteed basic income to every citizen, whether or not they are employed to ensure their survival and that they live in a dignified, humane way, preventing poverty, illness, homelessness, reducing crime, encouraging higher education and learning vocations as well as helping society become more prosperous as a whole. 

Wow. Forget raising the minimum wage. This is much much better idea.

The minimum wage could actually drop if we had basic income.

But Americans would never go for it. Miserably slogging through 12 hour days and having businesses open 24/7 is too engrained in our culture.

"BUT WHERE WILL THE GOVERNMENT GET THE MONEY?" screamed Joe Schmoe, slamming a meaty fist onto the table and getting mouth-froth all over the front of his greying tank top. "You libt*rds all think money grows on TREES!! HAHA!"

"But where will people get the incentive to work?!" Mindy Bindy cried, flapping her hands in front of her face. She’d had a fear of the unemployed lollygagging about ever since she was a child and her mother told her to be afraid of the unemployed lollygagging about. "You think people should get paid for nothing? I work hard for my money!”

"But who will serve me?" grumbled Marty McMoneybags. "Who will make me feel important? Who will do my laundry and cook my food and stand in front of me wearing a plastic smile while I take out all my stress—because I do have a lot of stress, you know, being this rich is stressful—on them?” He paused and straightened out the piles of hundred dollar bills on the desk in front of him, then raised his two watery, outraged eyes up to the Heavens. “Lord, if there are no poor people, how will I know that I’m rich??”

I laughed. This is perfect! Well said!

The thing is, while I’m sure you could scrape up a few people who’d be willing to just float by on a guaranteed minimum income? For most people the choice to work would be a no-brainer. “Hmmm. I can get by on 33k a year, or I can take that part time job and make 48k… enough to move to a better apartment, maybe take the family on vacation. Sold.” Hell, most people would want to work simply because it gives one a sense of dignity and something to do with one’s time. (Speaking as someone who’s been unemployed, on extended sick leave, etc. in her time, the boredom and sense of isolation that comes with not having a job is almost as bad as the humiliation of having to depend on other people for one’s survival.)

And with this system, part-time jobs and “non-skilled” jobs would be much more readily available because nobody would need to work two or three jobs just to stay afloat!

Which would ALSO mean that employers and customers couldn’t shamelessly exploit employees the way they can today, because if losing a job weren’t necessarily a financial disaster, more people would be willing to walk out on jobs where they weren’t being treated with dignity.

And if this also applies to students (and it should) then student loans would become much less of a problem, and fewer people would flunk out of school because of having to juggle studies and work.

Far fewer people would be forced to stay with abusive partners, parents or roommates because they couldn’t afford to move out.

And the thing is, all those people who suddenly had money? They’d be spending it. They’d be getting all the stuff they can’t afford now - new clothes, books, toys, locally-produced food, car repairs - and with each purchase money would flow BACK to the government, because VAT, also income tax.

The unemployed and/or disabled wouldn’t need special support any more - which would also mean the government could fire however many admins who are currently engaged in humiliating - *cough* making sure those people aren’t getting money they don’t deserve. Same for medical benefits and pensions. And I’m no legal scholar, but I somehow imagine less financial desperation would lead to less petty crime, and hence less need for police and security everywhere?

TL;DR Doomie thinks this is a good idea, laughs at those who protest.

reblogging for more top commentary

They tried something like this out in Canada as a sort of social experiment, called Mincome. What they found was that, on the whole, people continued to work about as much as they did before. Only new mothers and teenagers worked substantially less hours. 

But wait, there’s more. Because parents were spending just a little more time at home and involved with their families, test scores increased. Because teens didn’t have to work to support their families, drop-out rates decreased. Crime rates, hospital visits, psychiatric hospitalizations and domestic abuse rates all dropped, as well. More adults pursued higher education. Those who continued to work reported more job flexibility and more opportunity to choose employment they preferred.

Basically, now you can go prove to your asshole family members that society won’t collapse without poor people for you to feel better than.

The picture is awesome, but read the commentary, that’s what I’m reblogging for.

Wait when the heck did Canada do this?!?!?! I mean I know in Ontario we have this thing called the Trillium Benefit which is basically every person who files taxes and pays for rent will get a monthly cheque (based on how much you pay in rent). It’s not much but it’s something. But the Swiss know what’s up!!! Our economy would improve quite a bit, not to mention our quality of life.

(via savagesavant)


“When I walk into a church, I only see paintings of white angels. Why?" - Eartha Kitt 

“When I walk into a church, I only see paintings of white angels. Why?" - Eartha Kitt 

“When I walk into a church, I only see paintings of white angels. Why?" - Eartha Kitt 

When I walk into a church, I only see paintings of white angels. Why?- Eartha Kitt 

(via blackfashion)

asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.
asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations
(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,
Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.

asylum-art:

Alexandra Khitrova:Fantasy Illustrations

(Alexandra Khitrova) on deviantART, on Behance,

Designer Alexandra Khitrova Discovers a New Career through Her Stunning Fantasy Concept Artby Christopher Jobson on May 17, 2014. The reaction online and off was swift, and Khitrova soon found herself working on increasingly complex drawings as she suddenly began to get commissions. Now, only a year later, she is already working with a team of writers and artists on a feature film.

(via ilvos01)

itscolossal:

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye itscolossal:

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye itscolossal:

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye itscolossal:

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye itscolossal:

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye itscolossal:

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye
itscarororo:

ofgeography:

robin williams died today.
here is a list of things that robin williams was:
funny
sharp
kind
clever
and sad.
that’s important, the “and sad,” because sometimes sadness can feel like the only thing we are. it can feel all-encompassing. it can feel like the only thing anyone could possibly see, when they look at you: sad. that person is so, so, sad.
but there is always an “and.” we are never just sad. we are never only. we are always and.
we have all known people who were sad, who are sad; some of us are ourselves sad. being sad does not remove the other parts of us, though it can make them harder for us to see. when you are sad, you don’t necessarily feel like you are also funny, and sharp, and clever, and kind.
but you still are. you don’t have to feel like something to be it.
those things are written on your bones, they are woven into the fabric of your skin. sadness can feel so big, so big and overwhelming and complete, even when it is not a directed sadness. maybe especially when it is not a directed sadness, when it’s a depression that has no direct cause and nothing we can name.
sometimes the sadness is too big. people try to cut it out, or starve it out, or drink it down, or drug it silent. if this is you: i’m sorry. if this is you: you are not alone. if this is you: remember that the solution is never to give up, because you do not live in a vacuum. there are people waiting for you. there are films and songs and books and not-sadness waiting for you. i know that you don’t feel like waiting, but wait anyway.
if you need help, ask for it. here’s a link to crisis centers across the globe. if you live in the U.S., this is the national suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255.
robin williams died today, but the genie didn’t, and mrs. doubtfire didn’t, and peter pan didn’t. sean maquire didn’t, and professor philip brainard didn’t, and alan parrish didn’t. batty koda didn’t. john keating didn’t. you didn’t. 
don’t.

i wasn’t going to reblog anymore on this but i read this and i feel like there are probably some folks on here who might need to read it, too.

itscarororo:

ofgeography:

robin williams died today.

here is a list of things that robin williams was:

  • funny
  • sharp
  • kind
  • clever
  • and sad.

that’s important, the “and sad,” because sometimes sadness can feel like the only thing we are. it can feel all-encompassing. it can feel like the only thing anyone could possibly see, when they look at you: sad. that person is so, so, sad.

but there is always an “and.” we are never just sad. we are never only. we are always and.

we have all known people who were sad, who are sad; some of us are ourselves sad. being sad does not remove the other parts of us, though it can make them harder for us to see. when you are sad, you don’t necessarily feel like you are also funny, and sharp, and clever, and kind.

but you still are. you don’t have to feel like something to be it.

those things are written on your bones, they are woven into the fabric of your skin. sadness can feel so big, so big and overwhelming and complete, even when it is not a directed sadness. maybe especially when it is not a directed sadness, when it’s a depression that has no direct cause and nothing we can name.

sometimes the sadness is too big. people try to cut it out, or starve it out, or drink it down, or drug it silent. if this is you: i’m sorry. if this is you: you are not alone. if this is you: remember that the solution is never to give up, because you do not live in a vacuum. there are people waiting for you. there are films and songs and books and not-sadness waiting for you. i know that you don’t feel like waiting, but wait anyway.

if you need help, ask for it. here’s a link to crisis centers across the globe. if you live in the U.S., this is the national suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255.

robin williams died today, but the genie didn’t, and mrs. doubtfire didn’t, and peter pan didn’t. sean maquire didn’t, and professor philip brainard didn’t, and alan parrish didn’t. batty koda didn’t. john keating didn’t. you didn’t. 

don’t.

i wasn’t going to reblog anymore on this but i read this and i feel like there are probably some folks on here who might need to read it, too.

(via silvermoon424)